Moonlight Plains

Moonlight Plains 1

by Barbara Hannay

Paperback / softback Publication Date: 27/08/2014

4/5 Rating 1 Reviews Add your review
$29.99
In 1942, as the Japanese sweep towards northern Australia and allied troops swarm into Townsville, Kitty Martin is sent inland to the safety of Moonlight Plains. But when two American airmen crash on the isolated property, she is forced to grow up fast, coming face to face with tragedy, with love ...and with heartbreak. Years on, and Sally Piper, a young journalist, is sent to Moonlight Plains to cover the story of a cattleman turned builder who is restoring his grandmother's forgotten homestead. Sparks fly between them, but Sally is struggling to let go of the past, and Luke has his eyes fixed firmly on the future. What they uncover together is a shocking secret that has been kept safe for more than seventy years. Now the entire family's happiness is at stake - or does the truth about the past hold a valuable lesson for the future? A breathtaking novel about finding love against all the odds that will keep you captivated from beginning to end.
ISBN:
9781921901928
Category:
Sagas
Format:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
27-08-2014
Publisher:
PENGUIN BOOKS AUSTRALIA
Country of origin:
Australia
Pages:
384
Dimensions (mm):
234x154x28mm
Weight:
0.51kg
Barbara Hannay

Barbara Hannay's first romance novel was published in 1999. She lives in Northern Australia, a fascinating and beautiful location that provides a rich setting for many of her books.

When she's not writing, Barbara enjoys refreshing her imagination by traveling with her writer husband to explore exciting new overseas destinations, or to revisit the awe-inspiring mystery of the Australian Outback.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating

4 / 5 (1 Ratings)
  • Winsome rural romance

    by on

    Continuing her loosely linked series featuring the Fairburn family, Barbara Hannay presents Moonlight Plains, an engaging romance which blends a contemporary and historical narrative.

    In 1942, as the Japanese threaten the coast of North Queensland, nineteen year old Kitty Martin is sent to Moonlight Plains, the home of her widowed great uncle, far west of Townsville. Kitty, frustrated to be thwarted in her desire to assist in the war effort, is only in residence for a few weeks when two US airmen, blown off course, are forced to ditch their planes at the isolated property, and she finds herself facing tragedy... and heartbreak.
    Nearly seventy years later, Kitty is glad her grandson is restoring the faded grandeur of the homestead at Moonlight Plains and quietly pleased that her young friend Sally Piper, a journalist, has taken an interest both in the project, and Luke Fairburn. Kitty only hopes that with the restoration of the past, she can keep hidden her own long held secret that could ruin everything.

    Kitty's wartime narrative reveals a bittersweet love story, of risks taken and hearts broken. Kitty's 70 year old secret is easily guessed but I really liked her storyline which is sweet and poignant and I felt for Kitty confronted with a difficult choice in a difficult time.

    The development of Sally and Luke's contemporary relationship follows a familiar path, their physical attraction eventually leads to deeper feelings though neither are willing to admit it. I could understand Sally's hesitance, though I thought the specific reason for her feelings of guilt was an odd aside.

    I didn't think Luke's reaction to his grandmother's secret was entirely in keeping with his character. A moment of pique I could understand but his hurt feelings, even in light of his relationship with Sally, seemed excessive. Laura's reaction to the cache of secret letters written by her father to Kitty was more believable given she lacked the context of the relationship and was still grieving both her father's passing and bitter over her recent marital breakdown.

    I often forget that WW2 was also fought on our shores (I've complained before about the failure of the Australian curriculum to focus on the conflicts that occurred on our own soil when I was at school) and so I appreciated the brief glimpse from Hannay of its effects on Townsville and its residents. I also found it easy to visualise the restored grandeur of the old Queenslander at Moonlight Plains, nestled within its bush setting.

    A winsome novel, Moonlight Plains seamlessly weaves together a lovely story of love lost and gained. This is another delightful rural romance from Barbara Hannay, following on from Zoe's Muster and Home Before Sundown.