The Good Daughter

The Good Daughter 3

by Karin Slaughter

Paperback / softback Publication Date: 24/07/2017

5/5 Rating 3 Reviews
  $32.99

Two girls are forced into the woods at gunpoint. One runs for her life. One is left behind ...

Twenty-eight years ago, Charlotte and Samantha Quinn's happy smalltown family life was torn apart by a terrifying attack on their family home. It left their mother dead. It left their father Pikeville's notorious defence attorney devastated. And it left the family fractured beyond repair, consumed by secrets from that terrible night.

Twenty-eight years later, and Charlie has followed in her father's footsteps to become a lawyer herself the archetypal good daughter. But when violence comes to Pikeville again and a shocking tragedy leaves the whole town traumatised Charlie is plunged into a nightmare.

Not only is she the first witness on the scene, but it's a case which can't help triggering the terrible memories she's spent so long trying to suppress. Because the shocking truth about the crime which destroyed her family nearly thirty years ago won't stay buried for ever ...

‘This is a great writer at the peak of her powers. Karin Slaughter is at her nail biting, heart stopping, emotionally draining best.’ Peter James

‘Simply the best book you'll read all year. Raw, powerful and utterly gripping yet written with a tenderness and empathy that will break your heart’. Kathryn Stockett, bestselling author of The Help

ISBN:
9781460751732
9781460751732
Category:
Crime & Mystery
Format:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
24-07-2017
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers (Australia) Pty Ltd
Country of origin:
Australia
Pages:
512
Dimensions (mm):
234x153x37mm
Weight:
0.63kg
Karin Slaughter

Karin Slaughter is one of the world's most popular and acclaimed storytellers.

Published in 36 languages, with more than 35 million copies sold across the globe, her sixteen novels include the Grant County and Will Trent books, as well as the Edgar-nominated Cop Town and the instant New York Times bestselling novel Pretty Girls.

A native of Georgia, Karin currently lives in Atlanta. Her Will Trent series, Grant County series, and standalone novel Cop Town are all in development for film and television.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating

5 / 5 (3 Ratings)
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  • Excellent read!

    by on

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book, I read it in one sitting as I couldn't put it down!! Lots of twists and turns, with a dysfunctional family at the heart...I highly recommend it for anyone that likes a good thriller.

  • Loved it

    by on

    I absolutely loved this book. It follows the lives of Charlie and Samantha Quinn, who are separated from a young age after a horrific crime takes place in their family home, and their family unit breaks down and they move away from each other and follow different paths in their lives. Charlie, the younger, sister stays in Pikeville to look after her father and follow in his footsteps, becoming a criminal lawyer, while Samantha the older sister, moves to New York and becomes a patent attorney. Although the two sisters grew up in the same household, they do not see eye to eye on anything and are two very different people; Charlie is the younger, more rebellious type, with a quick temper while Samantha is the older sister, always keeping her cool and being in control.
    When tragedy strikes in the small town of Pikeville, Charlie's husband reaches out to the estranged sister, Samantha (after many years of not having seen or spoken with each other after an explosive argument), and asks her if she could return to their hometown to help out her sister and father. For Samantha, Pikeville holds many disturbing and painful memories, stirring up emotions and traumas that she had not felt for years, and she is in two minds about whether to disrupt her everyday routine and go back to a town that she vowed never to go back to after the terrible tragedy that occurred all those years ago, or stay in what is now her home in New York.
    This book is a must read. It is a very powerful novel that depicts not only the invisible threads that keep families together, but the strength it takes to overcome anguish and family conflict to ultimately reach forgiveness. I will definitely be reading more books by this author.

  • Once again, Slaughter does not disappoint

    by on

    The Good Daughter is the third full-length stand-alone novel by popular American author, Karin Slaughter. Early one May morning, small-town Georgia lawyer Charlotte Quinn is at Pikeville Middle School for an embarrassing reason when she is caught in a school shooting. Quick action by those present averts a major tragedy, but Charlie is disturbed by the actions of the Police officers who attend, and those of a witness who takes an active role, as well as the affect of the shooter. And, inevitably, Charlie is forcefully reminded of the incident that devastated her family, twenty-eight years earlier.

    Charlie’s father, Rusty Quin is a lawyer infamous (and reviled) for representing those that no-one else will: murderers, rapists, petty criminals unlikely to pay. So of course, he is acting for the shooter, which attracts something more than just the usual condemnation from the town. Meanwhile, a certain earlier indiscretion magnifies the awkwardness between Charlie and her estranged husband, Assistant District Attorney, Ben Bernard.

    Another gripping page-turner from Karin Slaughter in which the action takes place over the space of three days; the recall goes back thirty years. It includes an excellent court scene, lots of clever banter between characters and a generous dose of very dark humour throughout. Slaughter’s characters are complex; all have scars, both mental and physical, all are strong but betray very human flaws; there are no saints here, but these characters are easy to care about. And of course, there are twists and red herrings that will keep the reader guessing right up to the final pages. Once again, Slaughter does not disappoint.