The Unknown Terrorist

The Unknown Terrorist 2

by Richard Flanagan

Paperback / softback Publication Date: 01/02/2012

4/5 Rating 2 Reviews
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What would you do if you turned on the television and saw you were the most wanted terrorist in the country?

Gina Davies is about to find out. After spending a night with an attractive stranger, she has become a prime suspect in the investigation of an attempted terrorist attack. When police find three unexploded bombs at a stadium and her enigmatic lover suddenly goes missing, Gina spends five days on the run and witnesses every truth of her life twisted into a betrayal.

The Unknown Terrorist is a relentless tour de force that paints a devastating picture of a contemporary society gone haywire, where the ceaseless drumbeat of terror-alert levels, newsbreaks, and fear of the unknown pushes one woman ever closer to breaking point. This is an extraordinary achievement, chilling, impossible to put down, and all too familiar.

ISBN:
9781742755113
9781742755113
Category:
Thriller / suspense
Format:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
01-02-2012
Publisher:
Random House Australia
Country of origin:
Australia
Pages:
336
Dimensions (mm):
199x129x21mm
Weight:
0.23kg
Richard Flanagan

Richard Flanagan was born in Longford, Tasmania, in 1961. He is descended from Irish convicts transported to Van Diemen’s Land in the 1840s. His father is a survivor of the Burma Death Railway. One of his three brothers is Australian Rules football journalist Martin Flanagan. He grew up in the remote mining town of Rosebery on Tasmania’s western coast.

His novels, Death Of A River Guide, The Sound Of One Hand Clapping, Gould’s Book Of Fish, The Unknown Terrorist, Wanting and The Narrow Road to the Deep North have received numerous honours and are published in twenty-six countries.

He directed a feature film version of The Sound Of One Hand Clapping. A collection of his essays is published as And What Do You Do, Mr Gable?

His latest book The Narrow Road to the Deep North won the 2014 Man Booker Prize for Fiction.

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Customer Reviews

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4 / 5 (2 Ratings)
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  • Narrow road to the deep north

    by on

    My favourite book of 2014.told with insight and insight Flanagan captures POW life through a mix of imagination an factual history.A must read for anyone interested in love stories, historical icons and complex storytelling.

  • powerful read

    by on

    The Unknown Terrorist is the fourth novel by Australian author, Richard Flanagan. After a night of passion with an attractive young stranger, Gina Davies wakes to everyones worst nightmare: she finds she has become a terror suspect. Within the space of three days, her life goes from one of happiness, of an optimistic future, to the surreality of being a fugitive with nothing. All it took was a bit of post-9/11 hysteria, some unexploded bombs in backpacks, a journalists career on a downhill slide, some sagging government approval ratings and a snub. For Sydneysiders, Flanagans characters feel familiar, their dialogue is genuine and the whole series of events has a completely plausible and a frighteningly authentic feel, even as they hurtle towards their tragic conclusion. As Flanagan demonstrates how easily a set of circumstances can condemn an innocent, he also shows the power of the media and fear-mongering. On terrorism, his main character muses: she had the odd idea that the terrorism question had become a fad, like body piercing or flares; a fashion that had come and would go like this seasons colours. This powerful read is fittingly dedicated to David Hicks.