Best Short Stories Omnibus - Volume 2

Best Short Stories Omnibus - Volume 2

by August NemoMary Shelley D. H. Lawrence and others

Epub (Kobo), Epub (Adobe) Publication Date: 10/04/2020

  $16.99

This book contains 350 short stories from 50 classic, prize-winning and noteworthy authors. Wisely chosen by the literary critic August Nemo for the book series 7 Best Short Stories, this omnibus contains the stories of the following writers: - Mary Shelley - D. H. Lawrence - Ellis Parker Butler - Anthony Trollope - Zona Gale - Emma Orczy - Don Marquis - Charles W. Chesnutt - Kathleen Norris - Stanley G. Weinbaum - Honoré de Balzac - M. R. James - Banjo Paterson - Bret Harte - Henry Lawson - W. W. Jacobs - Charlotte M. Yonge - Mary E. Wilkins Freeman - L. Frank Baum - O. Henry - William Dean Howells - T. S. Arthur - Sherwood Anderson - Robert Barr - Lafcadio Hearn - Giovanni Verga - Hamlin Garland - Émile Zola - Stewart Edward White - Sarah Orne Jewett - Willa Cather - George Ade - Robert W. Chambers - Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson - Ruth McEnery Stuart - Lord Dunsany - George Gissing - Théophile Gautier - Paul Heyse - Selma Lagerlöf - Thomas Burke - Edith Nesbit - Arthur Morrison - Stacy Aumonier - John Galsworthy - E. W. Hornung - Ernest Bramah

ISBN:
9783968587172
9783968587172
Category:
Anthologies (non-poetry)
Format:
Epub (Kobo), Epub (Adobe)
Publication Date:
10-04-2020
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tacet Books
Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was born on August 30, 1797, into a life of personal tragedy. In 1816, she married the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and that summer traveled with him and a host of other Romantic intellectuals to Geneva.

Her greatest achievement was piecing together one of the most terrifying and renowned stories of all time: Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. Shelley conceived Frankenstein in, according to her, "a waking dream."

This vision was simply of a student kneeling before a corpse brought to life. Yet this tale of a mad creator and his abomination has inspired a multitude of storytellers and artists. She died on February 1, 1851.,

D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence, born in England in 1885, is one of the key figures in literary modernism. Among his most notable novels are Sons and Lovers (1913), Women in Love (1920) and Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928). Kangaroo (1923) was published the year after Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, spent three months in Australia. Lawrence died in France in 1930.

M. R. James

Montague Rhodes James was born on 1 August 1862 near Bury St Edmunds, though he spent long periods of his later life in Suffolk, which provided the setting for many of his ghost stories. He studied at Eton and Kings College, Cambridge, where he was eventually elected Fellow, and then made Provost in 1905. In 1918 he became Provost of Eton.

He was a renowed medievalist and biblical scholar, and published works on palaeography, antiquarianism, bibliography and history, guides to Suffolk and Norfolk, as well as editing a collection of ghost stories by Sheridan Le Fanu.

However, he remains best known for his own ghost stories, which were published in several collections including Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1904), A Thin Ghost and Other Stories (1919), A Warning to the Curious (1925) and a collected edition in 1931. M. R. James never married and died on 12 June 1936.

Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson was born in Grenfell, NSW, in 1867. At 14 he became totally deaf, an affliction which many have suggested rendered his world all the more vivid and subsequently enlivened his later writing.

After a stint of coach painting, he edited a periodical, The Republican, and began writing verse and short stories. His first work of short fiction appeared in the Bulletin in 1888.

He travelled and wrote short fiction and poetry throughout his life and published numerous collections of both even as his marriage collapsed and he descended into poverty and mental illness. He died in 1922, leaving his wife and two children.

W. W. Jacobs

William Wymark Jacobs (1863 1943) was a prolific short-story writer.

Known for his trademark wit even in the horror story 'The Monkey's Paw', for which he is best known Jacobs set most of his stories in the docks of East London, where he lived from a young age, as well as in Essex, where he moved in his middle age.

L. Frank Baum

Lyman Frank Baum, born May 15 1856, was an American author of children's books, best known for writing The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen novel sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a host of other works (55 novels in total, plus four "lost" novels, 83 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings), and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen.

His works anticipated such century-later commonplaces as television, augmented reality, laptop computers (The Master Key), wireless telephones (Tik-Tok of Oz), women in high risk, action-heavy occupations (Mary Louise in the Country), and the ubiquity of advertising on clothing (Aunt Jane's Nieces at Work).

On May 5, 1919, Baum suffered from a stroke. He died quietly the next day, nine days short of his 63rd birthday.His final Oz book, Glinda of Oz, was published on July 10, 1920, a year after his death. The Oz series was continued long after his death by other authors, notably Ruth Plumly Thompson, who wrote an additional nineteen Oz books.

Lafcadio Hearn

Lafcadio Hearn (1850–1904) was instrumental in introducing Western readers to Japanese culture and literature. Raised in Dublin and a longtime resident of the United States, the writer, translator, and teacher adopted Japanese citizenship and served as Professor of English Literature at the Imperial University of Tokyo.

Giovanni Verga

Giovanni Verga (b. 1840, Catania, Sicily) was an Italian realist writer, best known for his depictions of life in Sicily and his strong use of dialogue.

This dialogic realism would lead to his renown in such novels as I Malavoglia, and the short story Cavalleria Rusticana, which would later be adapted into a play.

Émile Zola

Emile Zola, born in 1840, was the founder of the Naturalist movement in French literature.

His novel Therese Raquin caused a scandal on publication and was followed by his brilliant Rougon-Macquart cycle (1871-1893), a series of twenty novels focussed on one family.

Zola died in mysterious circumstances in 1902, the victim of an accident or murder.

Willa Cather

Willa Cather was born in Virginia in 1873 and moved to Nebraska, with its wide open plains and immigrant farming communities, at the age of nine.

This landscape would deeply affect her later writing. She attended university and became a journalist and teacher in Pittsburgh, and then a magazine editor in New York.

Her first major novel, O Pioneers!, appeared in 1913, and was followed by two more in her prairie trilogy: The Song of the Lark and My Antonia. She lived with the editor Edith Lewis for thirty-nine years until her death in 1947.

Edith Nesbit

Edith Nesbit was an English author and poet who was born in 1858.

As well as writing for children, she wrote poems, plays and was also a political activist and co-founded the Fabian Society.

Her most famous works are The Railway Children and Five Children and It.

John Galsworthy

English novelist and playwright John Galsworthy (1867–1933) was among the first writers of the Edwardian era to challenge the social ideals portrayed in Victorian literature. The plight of women trapped in unhappy marriages is among his recurring themes, and in addition to championing women's rights, his work promoted prison reform and animal welfare.

This item is delivered digitally

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review Best Short Stories Omnibus - Volume 2.