Big Book of Best Short Stories - Volume 4

Big Book of Best Short Stories - Volume 4

by James JoyceLeo Tolstoy Nikolai Gogol and others

Epub (Kobo), Epub (Adobe) Publication Date: 23/01/2019

  $5.99

Ten of the greatest authors of all time present their great works in the short story genre. A great compilation of tales for all tastes with the great geniuses of literature in his most acclaimed works. This selection specially chosen by the literary critic August Nemo, contains the following stories: Nikolai Gogol The Nose The Viy The Cloak Old-Fashioned Farmers The Overcoat Memoirs of a Madman The Mysterious Portrait *** Anton Chekhov The Lady With The Little Dog Ward No. 6 A Joke The Darling Kashtanka The Black Monk In The Ravine *** Joseph Conrad's The Idiots An Outpost of Progress Amy Foster Youth An Anarchist The Secret Sharer The Return *** Leonid Andreyev Lazarus On The Day of Crucifixion The Crushed Flower The Serpent's Story JUdas Iscariot The Little Angel A Story Wich Will Never Be Finished *** James Joyce The Sisters Eveline Araby A Painful Case The Dead Two Gallants After the Race *** Fyodor Dostoevsky White Nights An Honest Thief The Christmas Tree and the Wedding Notes From Underground The Dream of a Ridiculous Man A Little Hero Mr. Prohartchin *** Alexander Pushkin The Queen of Spades The Shot The Snowstorm The Postmaster The Coffin-maker Kirdjali Peter, The Great's Negro *** Turgenev's A Desperate Character Knock, Knock, Knock A Strange Story The Dog The District Doctor The Inn Mumu *** Alexei Peshkov One Autumn Night Twenty Six Men and a Girl The Dead Man Waiting for the Ferry The Billionaire The Birth of a Man *** Leo Tolstoy God Sees the Truth, But Waits Papa Panov's Special Christmas Three Questions Work, Death and Sickness – A Legend How Much Land Does a Man Needs? The Death of Ivan Ilyich Alyosha the Pot

ISBN:
9788577770441
9788577770441
Category:
Classic fiction
Format:
Epub (Kobo), Epub (Adobe)
Publication Date:
23-01-2019
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tacet Books
James Joyce

James Joyce was born in Dublin on 2 February 1882, the eldest of ten children in a family which, after brief prosperity, collapsed into poverty. He was none the less educated at the best Jesuit schools and then at University College, Dublin, and displayed considerable academic and literary ability.

Although he spent most of his adult life outside Ireland, Joyce's psychological and fictional universe is firmly rooted in his native Dublin, the city which provides the settings and much of the subject matter for all his fiction.

He is best known for his landmark novel Ulysses (1922) and its controversial successor Finnegans Wake (1939), as well as the short story collection Dubliners (1914) and the semi-autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916). James Joyce died in Zurich, on 13 January 1941.

Leo Tolstoy

Russian author, a master of realistic fiction and one of the world's greatest novelists.

Tolstoy is best known for his two longest works, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, which are commonly regarded as among the finest novels ever written. War and Peace in particular seems virtually to define this form for many readers and critics. Among Tolstoy's shorter works, The Death of Ivan Ilyich is usually classed among the best examples of the novella. Especially during his last three decades Tolstoy also achieved world renown as a moral and religious teacher. His doctrine of nonresistance to evil had an important influence on Gandhi. Although Tolstoy's religious ideas no longer command the respect they once did, interest in his life and personality has, if anything, increased over the years.

Most readers will agree with the assessment of the 19th-century British poet and critic Matthew Arnold that a novel by Tolstoy is not a work of art but a piece of life; the 20th-century Russian author Isaak Babel commented that, if the world could write by itself, it would write like Tolstoy. Critics of diverse schools have agreed that somehow Tolstoy's works seem to elude all artifice. Most have stressed his ability to observe the smallest changes of consciousness and to record the slightest movements of the body. What another novelist would describe as a single act of consciousness, Tolstoy convincingly breaks down into a series of infinitesimally small steps. According to the English writer Virginia Woolf, who took for granted that Tolstoy was “the greatest of all novelists,” these observational powers elicited a kind of fear in readers, who “wish to escape from the gaze which Tolstoy fixes on us.”

Those who visited Tolstoy as an old man also reported feelings of great discomfort when he appeared to understand their unspoken thoughts. It was commonplace to describe him as godlike in his powers and titanic in his struggles to escape the limitations of the human condition. Some viewed Tolstoy as the embodiment of nature and pure vitality, others saw him as the incarnation of the world's conscience, but for almost all who knew him or read his works, he was not just one of the greatest writers who ever lived but a living symbol of the search for life's meaning.

Nikolai Gogol

Nikolai Gogol was a Russian writer and dramatist. He was born in the Ukraine in 1809.

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian physician, dramatist and author, is considered to be one of the greatest writers of short stories and modern drama. Born in Taganrog, a port town near the Black Sea, he attended medical school at Moscow University.

He began writing to supplement his income, writing short humorous sketches of contemporary Russian life. A successful literary careered followed, before his premature death of TB at the age of 44. He is best-remembered for his four dramatic masterpieces: The Seagull (1896), Uncle Vanya (1899), Three Sisters (1901) and The Cherry Orchard (1904).

Maxim Gorky

Maxim Gorky was born in 1868 in Nizhny Novgorod. After a grim childhood and some years of wandering he began to write stories and by his thirties had become famous both for fiction and plays.

He became involved in revolutionary activity against the tsarist regime in Russia and had a confused, difficult relationship with the Soviet dictatorship, partly living abroad and yet becoming the USSR's most feted and widely read author.

He died in 1936 under suspicious circumstances and Stalin and Molotov were among the bearers of his coffin. He is today most famous for his great autobiographical trilogy (of which My Childhood is the first part).

Ivan Turgenev

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev was born in 1818 in the province of Oryol. In 1827 he entered St Petersburg University where he studied philosophy. When he was nineteen he published his first poems and went to the University of Berlin.

After two years he returned to Russia and took his degree at the University of Moscow. After 1856 he lived mostly abroad, and he became the first Russian writer to gain a wide reputation in Europe. He wrote many novels, plays, short stories and novellas, of which First Love (1860) is the most famous. He died in Paris in 1883.

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