The Bethlehem Carols - 150+ Christmas Carols, Songs & Poems for the Holy Night

The Bethlehem Carols - 150+ Christmas Carols, Songs & Poems for the Holy Night

by Emily DickinsonWilliam Butler Yeats Samuel Taylor Coleridge and others
Epub (Kobo), Epub (Adobe)
Publication Date: 27/11/2020
  $1.99

This unique collection of Christmas carols, poems and songs is presented to you by e-artnow. Contents: Silent Night The Three Kings Christmas Bells Christmas At Sea Angels from the Realms of Glory Christmas in the Olden Time Marmion: A Christmas Poem Old Santa Claus The Twelve Days of Christmas Minstrels Ring Out, Wild Bells Christmas In India Hymn On The Morning Of Christ's Nativity A Christmas Carol The Oxen A Christmas Ghost Story The Savior Must Have Been A Docile Gentleman 'Twas just this time, last year, I died The Magi The Mahogany Tree A Bell Christmas Carol The Mystic's Christmas Christmas Cheer Noel: Christmas Eve 1913 The Holly and the Ivy Adam lay ybounden Christmas Day Christmas Fancies Twas jolly, jolly Wat A Tale Of Christmas Eve Jest 'Fore Christmas A Christmas Folksong As with Gladness Men of Old Nativity a Christmas Boar's Head Carol Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus Coventry Carol Here We Come A-wassailing A Defective Santa Claus King Winter Christmas Gifts and Other Poems The Night After Christmas O Little Town of Bethlehem The Shepherds A Christmas Carol A Christmas Hymn Brightest and Best of the Sons of the Morning God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen The Christmas Silence A Christmas Lullaby Hymn for the Nativity Masters in This Hall The Adoration of the Wise Men The Shepherds in Judea Christmas Carol Neighbors of the Christ Night Cradle Hymn An Ode on the Birth of Our Saviour Christmas Song A Hymn on the Nativity of My Saviour The Shepherd's Song "While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night" The Angels New Prince, New Pomp Wassailer's Song Sly Santa Claus The Waits God Bless Us Every One Bells Across the Snow Minstrels and Maids Song of the Holly Under the Holly-bough December The Christmas Holly So, Now Is Come Our Joyfulst Feast The Christmas Carol A Christmas Carmen Sery A Christmas Song The End of the Play Christ's Nativity Mark Well My Heavy, Doleful Tale The Glorious Song of Old A Christmas Carol for Children A Christmas Carol A Ballade of Old Loves Ballade of Christmas Ghosts Hang Up the Baby's Stocking A Christmas Prayer…

ISBN:
4064066386788
4064066386788
Category:
Poetry
Format:
Epub (Kobo), Epub (Adobe)
Publication Date:
27-11-2020
Language:
English
Publisher:
e-artnow
Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886) lived in almost complete isolation from the outside world, but maintained many correspondences and read widely.

Upon her death, Dickinson's family discovered 40 handbound volumes of her poems, which she had assembled herself.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

One of the great figures of the Romantic age, Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 1834) is known both for his poetry and prose, and for producing Lyrical Ballads with William Wordsworth, a work which revolutionized English poetry.

Plagued by debts and laudanum addiction, he left many pieces unfinished, yet his extraordinary influence was felt in literary figures as diverse as Wordsworth, Mary Shelley and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-94) was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. He studied law but preferred writing and in 1881 was inspired by his stepson to write Treasure Island.

Other famous adventure stories followed including Kidnapped, as well as the famous collection of poems for children, A Child's Garden of Verses. Robert Louis Stevenson is buried on the island of Samoa.

Walter Scott

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh on 15 August 1777. He was educated in Edinburgh and called to the bar in 1792, succeeding his father as Writer to the Signet, then Clerk of Session. He published anonymous translations of German Romantic poetry from 1797, in which year he also married. In 1805 he published his first major work, a romantic poem called The Lay of the Last Minstrel, became a partner in a printing business, and several other long poems followed, including Marmion (1808) and The Lady of the Lake (1810) . These poems found acclaim and great popularity, but from 1814 and the publication of Waverley , Scott turned almost exclusively to novel-writing, albeit anonymously.

A hugely prolific period of writing produced over twenty-five novels, including Rob Roy (1817), The Heart of Midlothian (1818), The Bride of Lammermoor (1819), Kenilworth (1821) and Redgauntlet (1824) . Already sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire, Scott was created a baronet in 1820. The printing business in which Scott was a partner ran into financial difficulties in 1826, and Scott devoted his energies to work in order to repay the firm’s creditors, publishing many more novels, dramatic works, histories and a life of Napoleon Bonaparte. Sir Walter Scott died on 21 September 1832 at Abbotsford, the home he had built on the Scottish Borders.

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771, educated at the High School and University there and admitted to the Scottish Bar in 1792. From 1799 until his death he was Sheriff of Selkirkshire, and from 1806 to 1830 he held a well-paid office as a principal clerk to the Court of Session in Edinburgh, the supreme Scottish civil court. From 1805, too, Scott was secretly an investor in, and increasingly controller of, the printing and publishing businesses of his associates, the Ballantyne brothers.

Clement Clarke Moore

Clement Clarke Moore was a scholar of ancient languages, but is remembered to this day for his memorable poem 'The Night Before Christmas', which started appeared anonymously in newspapers in the 1820s.

His character of St Nicholas strongly influenced the character of Santa Claus that we know today, and reading aloud the poem remains a favourite Christmas tradition.

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth was born on 7 April 1770 at Cockermouth, in the English Lake District, the son of a lawyer. He was one of five children and developed a close bond with his only sister, Dorothy, whom he lived with for most of his life. At the age of 17, shortly after the deaths of his parents, Wordsworth went to St John’s College, Cambridge, and after graduating travelled to Revolutionary France.

Upon returning to England he published his first poem and devoted himself wholly to writing. He became great friends with other Romantic poets and collaborated with Samuel Taylor Coleridge on Lyrical Ballads. In 1843, he succeeded Robert Southey as Poet Laureate and died in the year ‘Prelude’ was finally published, 1850.

Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling was born in India in 1865. After intermittently moving between India and England during his early life, he settled in the latter in 1889, published his novel The Light That Failed in 1891 and married Caroline (Carrie) Balestier the following year.

They returned to her home in Brattleboro, Vermont, where Kipling wrote the two Jungle Books and Captains Courageous.

He continued to write prolifically and was the first Englishman to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907 but his later years were darkened by the death of his son John at the Battle of Loos in 1915. He died in 1936.

John Milton

John Milton (1608 74) is best known for his epic masterpiece Paradise Lost and for his commitment to the republican cause.

He wrote the crucial justifications for the trial and execution of King Charles I and was Secretary for Foreign Tongues, thus becoming the voice of the revolution. His influence on English literature can only be rivalled by Shakespeare.

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy was born in Dorset in 1840. His first published novel was Desperate Remedies in 1871. Such was the success of these early works, which included A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873) and Far From the Madding Crowd (1874), that he gave up his work as an architect to concentrate on his writing.

However, he had difficulty publishing Tess of the D'Urbervilles (1889) and was forced to make changes in order for it to be judged suitable for family readers. This, coupled with the stormy reaction to the negative tone of Jude the Obscure (1895), prompted Hardy to abandon writing novels altogether and he concentrated on poetry for the rest of his life. He died in January 1928.

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray was born in Calcutta in 1811. On his way to England from India, the small Thackeray saw Napoleon on St Helena.

In 1837, Thackeray came to London and became a regular contributor to Fraser's Magazine. From 1842 to 1851, he was on the staff of Punch, and this was when he wrote Vanity Fair, the work which placed him in the first rank of novelists. He completed it when he was thirty-seven.

In 1857, Thackeray stood unsuccessfully as a parliamentary candidate for Oxford. In 1859 he took on the editorship of the Cornhill Magazine. He resigned the position in 1862 because kindliness and sensitivity of spirit made it difficult for him to turn down contributors.

Thackeray drew on his own experiences for his writing. He had a great weakness for gambling, a great desire for worldly success, and over his life hung the tragic illness of his wife Isabella, with whom he had hree daughters, one dying in infancy.

Thackeray died December 24, 1863. He was buried in Kensal Green, and a bust by Marochetti was put up to his memory in Westminster Abbey.

Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang was a Scots poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology.

He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales.

The Andrew Lang lectures at the University of St Andrews are named after him.

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